The $1,000 Genome: The Revolution in DNA Sequencing and the New Era of Personalized Medicine

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Gates, Bill. Gitlin, Jonathan Max.

We are witnessing a revolution in genomics - and it's only just begun

Green, Eric D. Guttmacher, Alan E. Haigh, Thomas. Hayden, E. Herper, Matthew and Langreth, Robert. Hirsch, Matthew. Hughes, Sally Smith. Genentech: The Beginnings of Biotech. Chicago:University of Chicago Press. Ledley, Robert S. Robert S. Reprinted in Robert S. Ledley et al. NBR Research Accomplishments — Washington, D.

Leonelli, Sabina. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. Mardis, Elaine R. Maughan, Tim. McFarland, Matt.

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Will Trump follow in his footsteps? Miller, Perry. The Life of the Mind in America. New York: Harcourt.

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Moore, Gordon E. Philadelphia:Chemical Heritage Press, pp. Mullin, Emily. Biomedical Research? National Human Genome Research Institute. With this information we can now take a patient sample, match their RNA up with our database of fingerprints and accurately pick out and report exactly what types of immune cells are present in their tumors.

Drug developers who are working on new drugs want to learn as much about their patient populations as possible. Everything in medicine today is based on the statistical average. How most people respond most of the time.

Physicians and drug developers will be able to make decisions on a person-by-person basis, using that information to precisely tailor their work to focus on what is best for each individual at any given point in time. We use both our own and third-party cookies for statistical purposes and to improve our services.

If you continue to browse, we consider that you accept the use of these. I Accept. By Dave Messina. In Cofactor Genomics , Investor. This is an amazing time to be in biology. We are now working at a completely different scale. Since then, tens of thousands of people have sent saliva samples to various consumer genomics firms. In a handful of cases, some recounted in the book, the results are nothing short of life-changing, and possibly life-saving.

Since , the cost of genome sequencing has plummeted at an astonishing rate. Imagine getting a full genome scan as easily and routinely as an MRI -- and without the claustrophobia!

The public perception of translational stem cell and genomics research

Even better, imagine a Star Trek Tricorder device reading your complete genetic code in a matter of minutes! That's a very real possibility in the next few years. The bigger question, however, is whether that is going to make a difference to the health of yourself and your family?

The $1,000 Genome: The Revolution in DNA Sequencing and the New Era of Personalized Medic

Having access to your full genome isn't magically going to reveal whether you're going to develop diabetes, cancer or heart disease, but it is going to become a fundamental part of your medical record. Among the challenges ahead of us discussed in the book: Will our genome data be kept private? Will we be subject to insurance or employment discrimination if we have our DNA sequenced?

Personalised medicine: The future of healthcare, based on individual patient data

What can my genome really tell me about my disease risk? Who is going to explain that analysis to me -- not to mention my family doctor? The technology will be with us very soon: the medical, legal and health care professions need to start preparing now. As should you! See: youtube. Kevin Davies, Ph. His previous book Cracking the Genome was translated into 15 languages. He was the founding editor of Nature Genetics , the world's leading genetics journal, which he headed for its first five years.

Davies holds an M. D in molecular genetics from the University of London. He held postdoctoral fellowships at MIT and Harvard Medical School before moving into science publishing as an editor with Nature magazine. He lives in Lexington, Massachusetts.

ISBN 13: 9781416569596

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